Strange, Infantile, and Vulgar in Liyang

If one is easily offended by Euro-style statue nudity, read no further.

Liyang sometimes feels like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. There is the majestic bamboo sea, the pristine Tianmahu Lake, and the delicious fish head soup that is famous throughout China. That would be the Dr. Jekyll aspect of Changzhou’s county-level city. That is what is shown to you on postcards and media blitzes meant to pump tourism into the region. The Mr. Hyde part — that would be darker aspect, for those not versed in the Robert Louis Stevenson classic — would be Liyang’s downtown. Sure, a friend of mine suggested being smitten by this thought: It has at least two Starbucks! But so does Jintan — and that district has large parks and cultural attractions near their downtown. Like in walking distance. This was brought into focus for me based upon a recent visit.

Above is a picture of Pingling Plaza. It’s one of the older shopping plazas in Liyang. A friend of mine who actually lives in town did correctly point out to me that the city now has shiny brand new malls by way of a Wanda and a Wuyue. However, those were not next to my hotel, and I remembered that Pingling had a Thai restaurant that I wanted to try last time I was in town. Only, Pingling Plaza is open for business in name only.

Roughly about 90% of the plaza is being gutted and remodeled. Most of the place is inaccessible. I quickly gave up on my search for the aforementioned Thai restaurant. I did try to see what else was open. But, I was met with this.

Nothing says “go away” more than blocked off escalator. But, you know what? I was undeterred, and there was a working elevator behind me. I ascended! This is what I saw.

So, let’s see? What we have here looks like a training center, a Chinese-style pizza shop, and lot of noise made by hammers, saws, and jackhammers. The limited access and all the noise means that these businesses are not getting a lot of casual foot traffic. I mean, the only way to get here is to take the elevator — or the stairs. How do they stay in business, besides hardcore dedicated customers? But, this is not the weirdest thing about Pingling Plaza. Dejected by the realization that I wasn’t going to get to try the Thai restaurant I saw last time I was in town, I descended the floors and left. Out into the rain. I walked around Pingling Plaza and noticed this.

So, somebody with an infantile imagination took a black sharpie and decided to add something to the anatomy of these statues. The statues themselves are actually quite common place in this end of China. Greek and Romanesque figures are pretty normal outside spas and restaurants vying for chic vibe. Of course, I accuse the vandalizer of being infantile, but then again I am writing about this because I thought it rose to New Jersey levels of silly weirdness. Who is truly being infantile here, the graffiti guy with the magic marker or the guy that decides he needs to take a photo of it? The answer is likely both.

This whole blog post sounds like I am being harsh and critical of Liyang. Maybe I am, and maybe I’m not? Despite any negative connotations this may bring up, I am looking forward to my next visit there. Liyang is technically Changzhou, but it has a local culture of it’s own. It is, after all, an independent county-level city and not a district in Changzhou the municipality. That whole trip consisted of being rained out and stuck mostly in a pre-booked hotel. So, maybe the next time I will see the good the downtown has to offer.

Not Japanese Street

Living on Hanjiang Road is such a privilege, and over the years I have rented an apartment there, it has easily become my favorite part of Xinbei and Changzhou in general. Want good sushi? Walk across the street! Want Indian food? Walk across the street! If you like Japanese food, living in this part of Xinbei is pretty much being spoiled. I realized this recently after I had to leave my apartment for a few nights due to my landlord needing to fix my ceiling. I took a room in the Haiyang Hotel across the street from Wanda. Now without access to a kitchen, I decided to walk across the street and grab some dinner.

I decided to try out one of the Japanese restaurants there. There are two to five eateries dedicated to this cuisine on Wanda’s pedestrain street. Randomly, I walked into one seeking a simple beef curry. To be fair, over time, I had tried some of the other shops, but they tended to be more ramen focused. The place I strolled into was an expansive menu place that you would easily find on Hanjiang Road.

But before that, I had some chicken meatballs.

And a diced up lamb chop.

And then, the aforementioned curry I had been craving. So, what did I think? Honestly, I was underwhelmed to the point where I realized that I was taking living on Japanese Street for granted. The portions were stingy. For a place that does both noodles and raw fish, there was not a buffet / all you can eat option. Ordering small portions ala carte can lead to hefty tabs to be paid off. Everything I ate had tastier options on Japanese Street. That’s not to say the food was bad — it did scratch a Japanese itch. I just realized that the places on Hanjiang Road were merely better.