Tag Archives: Art Galleries

This is Canal 5

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Changzhou is a big city by western standards. The thought of that usually hilarious to local Chinese. For example, how many Changzhous can you fit into a Shanghai or Beijing? However, since this blog was originally envisioned as a detailed, definitive “Changzhou Encyclopedia,” and sometimes, that means taking a step back and giving a general description of parts of the city that locals and long term expats take for granted. So, with that in mind, this is Canal 5 …

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Contemporary urban China gets a lot of flack / criticism for rampant demolition of historical sites. Sometimes, this is not true. Sometimes, older places get renovated and repurposed. This especially true with factory locations. And that is what has happened with Canal 5. I used to be a textile factory, and now, with a bit of municipal funding and a bit of effort, it has been spun into a multi-purpose cultural space.

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It’s one that has also retained its original industrial character. Old machines and machine parts sit around here on display as if were modern art.

 

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But this is also a place that you can find art galleries.

 

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And a theater — which a friend pointed out why Canal 5 has a statue of Shakespeare. The placement is not as random as one might think.

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And, the area is also the home to bars and other places to drink and eat.

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But the truth of Canal 5 is this: it’s still a work in progress, right now. Not everything is open. You still hear the clank and buzzing of construction during daylight hours. However, there are a lot of things open here. Plus, there are a number of smaller bars open outside this “creative campus.” And, that’s municipal labeling on the signage around there, not my language. In short, if you live near the city center, this a place to potentially spend some time in either the daytime or night.

Canal Five is next to — wait for it! — a canal. The closest landmark the Zhonglou Injoy Plaza shopping mall. If you walk west and pass under the overpass you will find said canal. If you follow the road adjacent to the canal, you will pass a number of small bars and eventually find it. Show this Chinese to a cab driver, and they should know where to go: 运河5号.

 

Wei Huabang Printmaking Exhibit

img_20161209_193534One of the nice things about the Changzhou Museum are the temporary exhibits. This are quite often a good reason for return visits from time to time. Recently, there has been gallery showing of the work of Wei Huabang.

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Print making is unique art in that it actually creates two works of art. One is the image produced on paper, and the other is the print itself. In a way, it ends up being a bas relief sculpture of sorts.

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The focus of the exhibit seems to be more of a career retrospective. The themes are varied to industrial at points to natural scenery and more abstract works. While Wei does traditional printmaking by carving out images with knives, he also has pioneered of rubbing paper onto stones to create detailed works of texture.

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There are a few weeks left before this exhibit goes away. It can be found on the ground floor of the musuem.

Zhang Quanhai and Microscopic Masterpieces

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Could the Mona Lisa have been painted on a single kernel of rice? Yes, it sounds like a fundamentally absurd question, but then again, the Changzhou Museum currently has a mind blowing temporary exhibit that led me to ask myself the question in the first place. Zhang Quanhai specializes in making colorful art so small, you need a magnifying glass just to look at it. He uses tiny, polished stones. While many are bigger than a rice kernel, the amount of precision and skill it takes create such small pictures is a bit breath taking. The exhibit is divided into two sections. One has the stones in ornate display boxes, and the other has Zhang’s work with magnifying glasses positioned over them. Out of the two options, the magnifying glasses were a better viewing experience. It allowed me, at least, to fully appreciate talent it takes to produce such tiny works of art. Time is running out on this exhibit, however. I cannot read Chinese, but the sign said it was supposed to end a few days ago. If it is still there, it’s on the third floor.

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