Tag Archives: Steak

A New Take on Steak

IMG_20170710_194636

 

When my father came to visit a few weeks ago, he was pretty burnt out on Chinese food. Before stepping off the train in Changzhou, he had spent about three weeks traveling the Middle Kingdom and saw sights like Lhasa, Tibet, the Mekong River, and more. He ate a lot of noodles. He ate a lot of rice. He had his fair share of dumplings, and he told me he had more than enough.

That posed a bit of a problem.  The day he arrived here, he settled into Hohai University’s guest center and asked, “Where are we going for lunch? I am starving.” Given that he was dead set against Chinese food, I was at a quandary. Where would we eat? I figured the two of us would walk over to Wanda Plaza, and the rest would eventually play out. McDonald’s or KFC would have been an a last resort. We ended up on the fourth floor, at a place called Tom’s Steak Cafeteria.

 

IMG_20170710_194448

 

The food was not good at all. In fact, I really hated it; I hide to pick chucks of non-chewable gristle out of my mouth. However, as my dad and I ate and caught up on family news, there was another thought in the back of my head. Places like Tom’s are pretty standard, and dismal, attempts at western cuisine. There are lots of places in China that try to do steak this way: sizzle a thin, very cheap slab of beef on a metal hot plate, crack open an egg, and serve spaghetti with a type of tomato sauce that likely came out of a can.

If an expat has lived in Changzhou for quite awhile, they will know steak places like this were the majority options a few years ago, if you wanted to eat something remotely western. Yes, there are fancy hotel restaurants and places like Jagerwirt that do steak well, but that is more of a fine dining experience and can be rather pricey — especially if you are eating on a university teacher’s salary and not an engineer’s or business person’s. However, times change. There seems to be a new trend going on Changzhou.

 

IMG_20170710_194348

 

Tiny, affordable steak places are popping up in malls like Wanda and Injoy. These places take a profoundly different approach than the standard Chinese steak restaurants. Think of these places as high-end snack bars. They don’t use hot metal plates. The sides of corn kernels and cold, faux-Italian noodles are gone, too. And seriously, good riddance. These places tend to strip away everything in the name of sheer simplicity. It’s actually kind of beautiful, from a culinary minimalist perspective.

 

IMG_20170710_194326

 

You pick your steak from a display case. You have a choice several different types of cuts. They weigh your meat and charge you by the gram. You also specify how red or not-red you want your meat. They cook it on a grill, season it, and serve it to you with a simple salad.

I can’t speak for the other places in this regard. The pictures are from Niuhaha at Xinbei’s Wanda Plaza. So, if a place is going to serve steak with very few embellishments, how was the quality of meat? I mean, the simplicity puts an extra emphasis on the steak itself, because there are no distractions like a pile of corn or a bunch of flavorless noodles? If the meat is bad, then the meal itself will fail miserably.

 

IMG_20170710_194338

 

What I had at Niuhaha was very, very good. They use imported Australian beef. It was cooked well with the right amount of juiciness and the amount of pepper and other seasonings was just about right. Now, is this the same as getting a steak at a place like Monkey King or Chocolate’s? No. Of course not. Don’t be freaking silly. That is steak as fine dining, and I will still go back those places when I want a sit down meal with friends and colleagues or am on a date. This is, as I said earlier, more of a cheaper fast-food approach.

I tried Niuhaha after I took my dad to Pudong International in Shanghai and said goodbye. My father has since returned to America. However, as I was enjoying my steak salad afterwards, something else dawned on me. Across the way, on Wanda’s fourth floor, was Tom’s Steak Cafeteria. It made me think. On my father’s first day of visiting, I had so wished I said, “Hey, Dad! Let’s try that tiny steak place over there!” We would have had a more satisfying meal if I had.

Blue Marlin’s Steak Toast

IMG_20160503_023212Even when Jack’s Home was spiraling out of business, they did one thing consistently well: steak toast. When their hamburgers and their attempts at German food got weird, the steak toast remained consistent and reliable. It got to the point where ate only that and ignored the rest of the menu.

So, what was this dish?  Imagine two small pieces of sirloin on two toast slices. One had Hollandaise sauce on it, the other had Bernaise. A side of french fries came with that. Whenever I ate this, I used to love to mop up the remaining sauce with my leftover fries. And then, Jack’s went out of business, and I lost access to one of my favorites go-to dinners. I grew to miss it. Chocolate’s didn’t have it, Monkey King didn’t have it, and Jagerwirt didn’t have it either. That pretty much meant no steak toast in Wujin.

Now, I’m in Xinbei, and recently rediscovered it again.  It’s actually better than what Jack’s Home could ever do, and keep in mind that I really liked eating it there. The recently relocated Blue Marlin offers this dish. They used to be near Candle’s and a bunch of other bars. Now, they can be found at the Rise Sun Manhattan Plaza.

As for the food, I had it steak cooked medium. Both the sauces and the sirloin’s juices didn’t make the toast soggy. At first, I wished there was a bit more of the two sauces, but I realized that anymore would have been too rich and stomach upsetting.

There is another reason why I love this particular menu item. It’s affordable, and I am a notorious cheapskate. Lets say you are a steak lover, but you don’t want to dish out 150 to 300 RMB and upwards on a slab of beef. Let’s also say you really don’t care whether something is “Angus” or “grass fed” or not. Then, this is something for you. You don’t need to celebrate or have a special occasion to eat it.